Americans in China – RUNWAY SHOW

CDFA/Vogue Fashion Fund’s pushed at in Beijing, China came to head with a runway show on Friday 21st June, 2013 at Beijing’s Ming Dynsaty  City Wall. Designers, that are CFDA members, as well as former CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund finalists; Marchesa, Proenza Schouler, and Rag & Bone, presented their Fall-Winter 2013 Collections in order to present a touch and taste of American fashion, in the similar, rapidly growing industry of China.

Marchesa Fall-Winter 2013 (AMERICANS IN CHINA)

Georgina Chapman and Keren Graig, took inspiration for their fall ready to wear collection from Francisco de Goya’s Portrait of Maria Teresa de Vallabriga on Horseback. The collection came as much of a throwback to the 18th century with a twist. There were over 30 looks altogether.

The looks are quite similar, set out for scarlet coats with long skirts and high collars. The silk trousers were kept in tone with the color, that of the equestrian coats. At points, too much draping never stood for a WOW look, however, the most simplest dresses were often always, the most flattering to eyes. Almost all were enriched in embroidery, but did not quite have a “fairy tail look” that the label remains known for, especially when it comes to runway shows.

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

Rag & Bone Fall-Winter 2013 (AMERICANS IN CHINA)

Americans-In-China-Runway

The collection comes as a mix between men and women fashion. It’s very dressed up, but at the same time, very casual too. The designers, David Neville and Marcus Wainwright very clearly came up with just the right “thing” for women this fall. The 60’s air travel; from uniforms that flight attendants wore, to all the dressy clothes that people wore while traveling by air, back when it was an “experience”, was the inspiration for the designers for their collection this season. The color pallete was kept dark, specifying to the air travel back then. For e.g military (air force) colors such as green, olive and black, contrasting along with bright colors such as orange, hinting back to the flight jackets that pilots of the air force wore. Overall,  the looks are very simple but chic, the kind that anyone would wear on a normal day out, or when catching a flight to Europe. *wink*

RAG & BONE

RAG & BONE

RAG & BONE

RAG & BONE

RAG & BONE

Proenza Schouler Fall-Winter 2013 (AMERICANS IN CHINA)

Americans-In-China-Runway-2_181253175413.jpg_article_gallery_slideshow_v2

With a flashback to the past of the Proenza Schouler collection of cocktail dresses, neons and what not color in the world, having set up for a monochrome theme of black and whites aswell as hints of light blue came as no shock. It was all about the cuts and shapes of the coats and jackets that had a wow impact on the audience. The collection showed a high level of maturity this time!

“We feel a little grown-up now,” said Lazaro Hernandez backstage after the elegantly authoritative Proenza Schoulder show. “We’re not in our twenties anymore! We’ve grown up on a business level and aesthetically and we wanted [the collection] to feel that way.” (via vogue)

According to the designers, they wanted something “snowy” now, with soft textures and well, soft EVERYTHING! To my surprise, the blouses and jackets were actually made from woven strips of leather and the motifs, laser cut! In short, heaps of effort was put in, even for the minutest details. Their starting point was the Zuma series of photographer John Divola, taking inspiration from the deserted houses of the beach in California.

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

americans in china

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